HolyLand Wildflowers

Wildflower photographed by Jeff Zablow at Kedesh Trail, Upper Galilee, Israel

That March hike along the Kedesh Trail in the Upper Galilee region of Israel. Me searching for butterflies, especially rare little blues. It’s hard I tell you, for my eyes kept locking in on fetching beautiful wildflowers. 20% counterproductive, for most cannot look for butterflies and notice new wildflowers at the same time. Fascination for the one means you will well miss the other.

But that’s my struggle, Barbara Ann, Ellen, Virginia, Caron, Deepthi, Jim, Roger, Peggy, Marcie, Pam, Phyllis, Cathy, Angela, Debra, Leslie . . .

These were just beseeching me to stop and admire them. Great Stork’s-bill (Erodium gruinum).

Me, just like They, thousands of years ago, admiring the sweet March blooms of the HolyLand.

Jeff

Eye Candy on Mule Wallow Road?

Long-Tailed Skipper Butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow on Mule Wallow Road trail in Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, Florida's Panhandle

All that was missing was Johnny Mathis, sweetly serenading as I worked the edges of the trail known as Mule Wallow Road. It took  awhile, but there I was last August 2015, the proverbial kid in a candy shop, pirouetting from one new butterfly to another, new wildflowers, new flies, new insect, new botany. All those years enjoying the shares of others, in Florida, requited, for there I was, for 4 days, in Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, in the northern Florida Panhandle.

This Long-tailed skipper butterfly was fresh and clean, and the Tall Ironweed blossoms must have been sweeter than sweet. How am I sure. This usually skittish butterfly almost totally disregarded my approach, and allowed me the honor of shooting away. The background here, green. A soothing, rich green. Johnny is still singing, I can just hear him.

Short of a nasty late summer tropical storm, the plan is to return to Georgia on the 8th of September, when the Liatris are in full show. They say that when that happens, butterflies flock to them. Sometime after the 8th, my goal is to get down there for about 4 days, staying in Perry, Florida. Alone again, naturally.

You know, you know how expectant I can be. Diagnosis? Just about incurably expectant. Guilty as charged. Doing what for me, comes . . . . . . . . y!

Jeff

Monardas Down South

Rare Monarda Wildflower photographed by Jeff Zablow in Hard Labor Creek State Park, GA

Phil was bedazzling me with new butterflies and new wildflowers at Hard Labor Creek State Park and Camping Ground, in north-central Georgia. It was August 2015, and the park was both wonderland and new to me.

This rare Monarda, Spotted Bee Balm, stopped me in my tracks. Again and again I looked at these blooms, and thought that they would look more in place on planet Mars, or something.

You don’t get complacent when you’re at the Briar Patch (Putnam County) or at Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge or here in Hard Labor Creek State Park. You can’t because there’s so much that is new and exciting for this Pittsburgh, ‘cum Brooklyn/Long Island guy. Virginia, Rose and Jerry and Phil and Dave W, Thanks for 2015! Now what’s on deck for 2016?

Jeff

Purple Clover in the HolyLand

Purple clover, photographed by Jeff Zablow on Qedesh trail, Israel

Bet you’re like me, meaning you presume that Israel has some wildflowers, but not that many. Rocks and hills, you know; but not much else. Each time I travel there, What? New this, new that. New butterflies, new wildflowers. Then you travel again the next year, not June, but this time March. OMG! All over again, new butterflies, new wildflowers.

The wildflower in the foreground is the flower head of Purple Clover (Trifolium Purpureum). It was so pert, so richly colored, and so very intricate in pattern and design. Had to stop and shoot, shoot, shoot. This trail in northernmost Upper Galilee region bore March’s huge bounty of wildflowers, a hint of which shines in the background of this image.

Flowers from March to May, and it is difficult to pass without the requisite stop and stare. My, my, you are beautiful this morning . . . as the other wildflowers respectfully await their turn for attention.

Jeff