The Only What? Butterfly

Harvester butterfly photographed at Raccoon Creek State Park, PA

I’ve seen them several times, those only on that Nichol Road Trail in Raccoon Creek State Park, Southwestern Pennsylvania. I remember those electrifying moments.

When I occasionally see someone elses Harvester Butterfly image, it awakens those way too few memories.

Meeting a Harvester butterfly, characterized by Glassberg’s A Swift Guide to the Butterflies of North America as LR-LU ( Locally Rare to Locally Uncommon ) does do that to me.

‘The Only What? Butterfly’ in North America because no other North American butterfly caterpillars are carniverous. Their consume aphids.

This image? I have always been in love with their plays of brown color and, I wanted to cop an image that I would be pleased with, before this winged beauty fled.

Jeff

Bear Oak & Edwards’

Edwards Hairstreak Butterfly in 1/2 Shade photographed by Jeff Zablow at Adams Lake Preserve

My 2 foot tall Bear Oak (purchased from Nearly Natives Nursery in Fayetteville, Georgia, an A+ natives nursery) will never be a 100′ tall giant. It is one of the ‘small oaks,’ and I would love to live and see it reach some 20 feet. Its leaves are unique looking, and it acorns, well I’ll have to wait some for them to be produced.

I’ve enriched my grasp of the plants and animals of these United States, to include those of southeastern America. Bear Oak is native to the US, and to America’s South.

The first time I saw Edwards’ Hairstreak butterflies was in June, 2017. They were a fresh flight, some 35 or so Edwards.’ I was struck by their rich, stunning reds, blues, white and black. They are usually described as ‘Locally Rare,’ and that morning, in. Lynx Prairie Reserve in Adams County, Ohio, I was so Thankful that we were there that week, to savor that artists palette of color, against a solid background of grayish-brown.

My young Bear Oak? Glassberg’s A Swift Guide to Butterflies of North America range map shows Edwards’ Hairstreaks flying just about as far south as my backyard. and Bear Oaks are their preferred hostplant.

Would it not be AmaZing! if one showed up next year? What’s that rock n’ roll song of maybe I’m a dreamer? Two or 3 more Bear Oaks?

Jeff