Why Did Mr. Guerin Choose So Holy A Name?

Azanous Jesous butterfly photographed by Jeffrey Zablow at Mt. Meron, Israel

This one of the Blue butterflies flies in the HolyLand. This one appeared on my Mt. Meron trail, in the very Upper Galilee. With so reverent a name as Azanus Jesous, I much wanted to score a good image of these tiny blues. Wingedbeauty’s visitors include many Christians, and I guessed that this butterfly, floating from blossom to HolyLand blossom, would mean alot to you.

Here is this mini-gem of a butterfly, resplendent with its numerous black hindwing dots and sweet reddish browns.

I wonder why Mr., Guerin named it so? Suggestions?

Jeff

Coppers In The Galilee (Really)

Lycaena Phlaeas butterfly, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Nahal Dishon National Park, Upper Galilee, Israel

We have many wingedbeauty Followers who love to see posts of butterflies in the HolyLand (Israel). I am happy to share some, for photographing in the pristine, almost unspoiled wilds of the Upper Galilee, Golan and the Golan’s Mt. Hermon, is thrilling, truth be told. To think that They walked these same ancient trails, and stopped to examine/admire the same butterflies, is very sobering, very profound.

So it was here, an encounter with this male Lycaena phlaeas timeus, a copper, met in Nahal Dishon National Park in the very Upper Galilee. He’s very vivid in color and marking, and he sports those classy blue spots, seen on the outer margin of his hindwing.

Photographing butterflies in the Galilee and the Upper Golan, wild, you don’t see anyone for hours. You’ve never done that yet, have you?

Not showing off, just stating the facts, M’am.

Jeff

Redux: That Female Blue-Spotted Arab

Blue-Spotted Arab Butterfly photographed by Jeffrey Zablow

The habitat: Very hot, rocky terrain at Ein Gedi, a short distance (but too hot to walk it) from the Dead Sea. The HolyLand. I went there to find this butterfly, the Blue-Spotted Arab and one or two others.

I made a big mistake, by not renting a car. I walked those mornings from my SPNI Nature field house to the border of that dry creek bed. Male Blue-Spotted Arabs were here and there amongst the rocky terrain. They would not allow any approach closer than 15-feet. I did what I do, and scored some good images. Females? I searched for them, and found perhaps three.

Here’s the most sympathetic of those female butterflies. She appreciated that I was near flush with the sun’s heat, and that I was one of the good guys. Her yellows and stark black plus, were strikingly beautiful.

A female Blue-Spotted Arab butterfly, in one of the most arid destinations in the world, smack dab in the middle of the HolyLand.

Just remembering those days in Ein Gedi . . . sing to me.

Jeff

My Birthday Butterfly

Plain Tiger butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow at Mishmarot, Israel

My Fuji slide film (Velvia 50)? I love it, even as its price continues to climb. My eyes are so attended to the hundreds of hours that I spend in the bush. When I get my images back from Parsons, Kansas, the rich color pleases me, for it is 100% true to the real-time butterflies that I see.

Yes, tomorrow is my birthday, and it will be a quiet one. On the eve of B-day, I’ve decided to share an image taken in the HolyLand, at Mishmarot, Israel, north of Tel Aviv and 15 minutes from Caeseria, and the Mediterranean Sea.

This Plain Tiger butterfly (Danaus chrysippus chrysippus) is closely related to North America’s Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). This Israeli one is much more difficult to approach than our Monarch. Scoring the image was not easy, and closer approach was not to happen.

I often wonder how you entertain my frequent sharing of HolyLand butterflies? Me? I think of Who? and How? Th-y saw them back then, and truth be told, I am moved by that. But with my Birthday hours away, I am going to hope that . . .

Jeff

HolyLand Wildflowers

Wildflower photographed by Jeff Zablow at Kedesh Trail, Upper Galilee, Israel

That March hike along the Kedesh Trail in the Upper Galilee region of Israel. Me searching for butterflies, especially rare little blues. It’s hard I tell you, for my eyes kept locking in on fetching beautiful wildflowers. 20% counterproductive, for most cannot look for butterflies and notice new wildflowers at the same time. Fascination for the one means you will well miss the other.

But that’s my struggle, Barbara Ann, Ellen, Virginia, Caron, Deepthi, Jim, Roger, Peggy, Marcie, Pam, Phyllis, Cathy, Angela, Debra, Leslie . . .

These were just beseeching me to stop and admire them. Great Stork’s-bill (Erodium gruinum).

Me, just like They, thousands of years ago, admiring the sweet March blooms of the HolyLand.

Jeff