Trying To Understand A Tree Frog

Tree Frog photographed by Jeff Zablow at Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia

We kept meeting tree frogs at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area. They fascinate me, they looking a bit goofy to me, and yet at the same time appearing to be wise and long experienced in the ways of the world.

With the upsetting news of the last many years, this tree frog shows no angst, anger or uncertainty. It remains in place, seemingly detached from the distractions that perpetuate in the world around it.

So I stood there, trying to understand this tree frog’s thinking. Was it thinking?

Florida’s Panhandle region, at the Gulf of Mexico.

Jeff

Dragonfly Tips? You’ve Got Dragonfly Tips?

Darner photographed by Jeff Zablow at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, Florida

I have for these many decades admired Dragonflies. Never, in those 1,000,000 hours in the field, has a dragonfly ever bothered me. In an earlier post here, I retold the real life experience I had with one as a boy in Brooklyn. We lived on the edge of development in the 1950’s, and an undeveloped ‘lot’ was around the corner from my house. That’s where this Love of wildlife began, believe it or not.

One day, I, proud of my speed and street skills (I grew up on those streets, with very interesting friends, so to speak), decided to prove to myself that I was fast enough to catch a good-sized dragonfly in mid-air. Know what? I did, I caught a big one, that’s how fast I was. Arrrrrrrgh! The pain of it’s bite was unbelievable!! I respected my Connected friends and that morning, I came to respect dragonflies forever.

No dragonfly has ever bothered me since, despite the Disrespect that I showed to that East 57th Street dragonfly.

Now, 4 months in, at our home in North Macon, Georgia, the mosquitoes in our natives Georgia backyard are beyond nuisance. I want to put out a ‘Come On Down’ call to dragonflies to come and make this their home, come and daily devour your weight in mosquitoes. No chemicals Leslie, no chemicals. Dragonflies.

Please share what you know of how to attract dragonflies to our central Georgia yard. You’ve got dragonfly tips?

Oh, and this darner was seen at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area – Spring Unit, in Florida’s northern Panhandle.

Jeff

Papilio Palamedes Ahead?

Palamedes Swallowtail Butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow in Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, Florida's Panhandle

We drive to the Georgia coast in August, for butterflies, beach, beauty and  . . . butterflies. I want to revisit butterflies I’d seen there several years ago: Little Metalmark, Eastern Pygmy Blue, Georgia Satyr and Great Southern White.

I’d met alot of Palamedes Swallowtails in the Florida Panhandle at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, and you want to know the truth? I love this image of a Palamedes met in the Spring Unit part of Big Bend. I compare this image with others, and I always am pleased with it. Always.

Nonetheless, if there were to be a fresh fresh Palamedes in Sapelo Island, or Brunswick, or Little St. Simons Island or on Jekyll Island, for 100% sure I’d ‘waste’ Fuji Velvia film on it, hoping against hope to come up with a better yet Palamedes image.

Place your bets . . . .

Jeff

Georgia: My Alamo . . . and the Satyr

Georgia Satyr Butterfly 3 photographed by Jeff Zablow at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, Florida

I moved to Georgia in July 2017. Eatonton was to be my home there for a little more than 2 years. Established a fine natives Georgia butterfly garden in downtown Eatonton, just 2 blocks for the County Courthouse. We had much JOY! in that garden, with visits from Great Purple Hairstreaks, Zebra Longwings, Giant Swallowtails, Palamedes Swallowtails and Monarchs. lots of Monarchs.

My whole life, from way back in Brooklyn when we had a postage stamp-size back garden, I’d dreamed of have a luxurious garden, with butterflies and wildlife, lots of wildlife. I achieve that goal, briefly, in Sheffield, Massachusetts, on those 35 acres in the sylvan Berkshire Mountains, but treachery forced the sale of that rich wildlife private refuge.

Georgia enabled me to fulfill. Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Success remained the driving force for me. Eatonton led us to reexamine, and Macon, Georgia beckoned. Now at home here in Macon, our backyard large and growing (just added today = Lobelia, Agastache, Bronze Fennel, Black & Blue Salvia & Coneflower), Georgia is all I had hope it would be, my Alamo, so to speak, my last stand. G-d has seen to it that I survived to this point, even overcoming the treachery of enemies note above, and Oh How I Hope G-d means for me to flourish this .68 acres, create an Oasis for Wildlife, and maybe, just maybe show it to those of you, whom I can get to visit us.

All the while you’ve been sampling this, you’ve been glancing at this affirmation of my affection for Georgia, my long sought after, finally achieved image of a Georgia Satyr butterfly, disregarding that I found it in nearby Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, across the Georgia border, in the Florida Panhandle (northwestern Florida).

My second trip to score a good Georgia image, and for me, affirmation, that despite what most say, I am a Georgian. A survivor of my own Alamo, I am. Thank Y-u.

Jeff

Phaon Crescent? Yes? Excellent!

Phaon Crescent Butterfly 3 photographed by Jeff Zablow at Big Bend Wildlife Management Area, Florida

Major Fun comes when you travel to distant places, and begin your search for butterflies, familiar and new. That’s what happened on our most recent trip to Big Bend Wildlife Management Area in the Florida Panhandle.

After living most of my life in the northeastern USA, it’s happily often now that I am pleased to meet new butterflies. That’s what happened here, when we were working the Spring Unit of Big Bend, along a swampy area trail. Along came this butterfly, and it stopped on this leaf. No time to stop and study, so I shot away. What I did know was that he WAS a Phaon Crescent and not a Pearl Crescent butterfly.

He had those cream colored bands on his forewings and those wide orange spots too. They prefer moist habitat, and that’s exactly where we were.

A fresh, beautiful Phaon pleasing me with good photo opps on a fine northern Florida morning. Excellent!

Jeff