Hiding At Clay Pond

Eyed Satyr Butterfly, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Jamestown Audubon Center, NY

Barbara Ann (A”H) and I were at Clay Pond Preserve in Frewsburg, New York, near Jamestown. It was a damp, humid morning, with the sun promising to return within the hour. It was early, as we waded through the 2-foot tall pond-edge grasses and sedges. As we moved, butterflies rose up from here and there, fleeing. There were more butterflies being rustled up than I would have expected. That reassured me that on that my second trip to Clay Pond, it remained a rich, healthy wetland destination.

I noticed this form in the grass ahead, and carefully making my approach, I kneeled down to get a better look, and this is what I saw, an Eyed Brown Butterfly (Satyroydes eurydice). The available light was limited, the air was moisture saturate, and the sky remain cloudy.

Almost like those TV shows where the cops are staking out a house, before sunrise or after sunset.

Jeff

Appalachian Brown Butterfly

Appalachian Brown Butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow in Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge, GA

Sharing this photo of an Appalachian Brown butterfly pleases me very much. These butterflies of swamps and wet woods have something special about them. When you spot one, you have got to crack a smile, for these are not butterflies that you can meet at your whim. They appear when they appear, and when they decide to, Poof! they are gone.

This magical butterfly was seen in the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in central Georgia’s Piedmont region.

Butterflies out of the sun, in the reduced light of the forest’s understory.

Jeff

Another Hidden From View Butterfly & Barbara Ann Case “OBM”

Eyed Brown butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow at Allenberg Bog in New York

I do delight when I introduce butterflies to you, that 99.99% of Americans have never seen. It so enthuses me, sharing the epiphany that G-d has bestowed upon us countless living things of beauty.

That’s the way I think, freed from those decades of working and raising my family. There has been, and continues to be, an infinite number of beautiful things about. Some can be seen at your doorstep (almost) and others have to be sought. This Eyed Brown butterfly soothes my long love of browns and versions of brown.

Seen at Allenberg Bog, with Barbara Ann Case. Very western New York State.

Barbara Ann left us on Friday, March 13, 2020. She led me through the almost unmarked trail, that took us to this gem of a peat moss bog. She was not in good health then, but she would not desist from heading out to, and exploring that spectacular, nearly unknown bog.

How will I find Allenberg this year? Who will lead me there? Who will fill the enormous void?

Jeff

The Beauty Of An Eyed Brown

Appalachian Brown Butterfly II photographed by Jeff Zablow at Prairie Fen Reserve, Ohio

We scoured Prairie Road Fen, Angela and Barbara Ann for orchids and wildflowers, with me keeping an eye out for butterflies. Near Dayton, Ohio, I was again and again impressed with the richness of Ohio reserves and parks.

They found their orchids, here at Prairie Fen Reserve and almost everywhere else, they with much experience with orchids and near relentless in their pursuit of them.

Me? I was reintroduced to several butterflies of the northeastern USA that are hard to find. This Eyed Brown butterfly was such, one I rarely see over the years. It’s home? Wet meadows.

Once my Fuji slides were returned from Dwayne’s Photo, I was thrilled by this image. Glassberg’s A Swift Guide to the Butterflies of North America cites Eyed Brown’s as “LR-U” at the southern edge of range,” and that made our meeting even more serendipitous. Rare to Uncommon brings a smile, for that 6 hour or so drive west from Pittsburgh, for such moments, made sense, much sense.

Studying the rich play of color on this left hindwing, I think of the subtle beauty it displays, those tiny eyes, shining as little spotlights, the jagged lines that enable us to differentiate this butterfly from the closely related Appalachian Brown butterfly, the rich hues of brown that I’m on record as . . . loving and the good capture of the head, legs and antennae.

The beauty of an eyed brown, a fresh eyed brown.

Jeff

Mt. Hermon and The ‘Wall’

Brown Argus Butterfly at Mt. Hermon, Israel

When the call went out, on their cellphone network, dozens of butterfly lovers converged on the ‘Wall,’ all anxious to see the Tropical Hairstreak butterfly that had been spotted near the entrance to the Mission, Texas development. 

It happened again when the Gold-Bordered Hairstreak was spotted, nectaring nearby. The Gold Bordered drew a near mob, and earlier I shared how I was considered “selfish” when I came in low and close, for my Macro- lens cannot do its job at a distance of 10 feet.

This Aricia agestis agestis butterfly on the peak of Mt. Hermon in the HolyLand suffered an audience of me and my guide, and Erin had sum zero interest in rare butterflies.

Poor Aricia agestis, earning just the excitement of a single butterfly lover, on that overheated, high peak at the roof of Israel.

Jeff