Another Hidden From View Butterfly & Barbara Ann Case “OBM”

Eyed Brown butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow at Allenberg Bog in New York

I do delight when I introduce butterflies to you, that 99.99% of Americans have never seen. It so enthuses me, sharing the epiphany that G-d has bestowed upon us countless living things of beauty.

That’s the way I think, freed from those decades of working and raising my family. There has been, and continues to be, an infinite number of beautiful things about. Some can be seen at your doorstep (almost) and others have to be sought. This Eyed Brown butterfly soothes my long love of browns and versions of brown.

Seen at Allenberg Bog, with Barbara Ann Case. Very western New York State.

Barbara Ann left us on Friday, March 13, 2020. She led me through the almost unmarked trail, that took us to this gem of a peat moss bog. She was not in good health then, but she would not desist from heading out to, and exploring that spectacular, nearly unknown bog.

How will I find Allenberg this year? Who will lead me there? Who will fill the enormous void?

Jeff

The Beauty Of An Eyed Brown

Appalachian Brown Butterfly II photographed by Jeff Zablow at Prairie Fen Reserve, Ohio

We scoured Prairie Road Fen, Angela and Barbara Ann for orchids and wildflowers, with me keeping an eye out for butterflies. Near Dayton, Ohio, I was again and again impressed with the richness of Ohio reserves and parks.

They found their orchids, here at Prairie Fen Reserve and almost everywhere else, they with much experience with orchids and near relentless in their pursuit of them.

Me? I was reintroduced to several butterflies of the northeastern USA that are hard to find. This Eyed Brown butterfly was such, one I rarely see over the years. It’s home? Wet meadows.

Once my Fuji slides were returned from Dwayne’s Photo, I was thrilled by this image. Glassberg’s A Swift Guide to the Butterflies of North America cites Eyed Brown’s as “LR-U” at the southern edge of range,” and that made our meeting even more serendipitous. Rare to Uncommon brings a smile, for that 6 hour or so drive west from Pittsburgh, for such moments, made sense, much sense.

Studying the rich play of color on this left hindwing, I think of the subtle beauty it displays, those tiny eyes, shining as little spotlights, the jagged lines that enable us to differentiate this butterfly from the closely related Appalachian Brown butterfly, the rich hues of brown that I’m on record as . . . loving and the good capture of the head, legs and antennae.

The beauty of an eyed brown, a fresh eyed brown.

Jeff

Mt. Hermon and The ‘Wall’

Brown Argus Butterfly at Mt. Hermon, Israel

When the call went out, on their cellphone network, dozens of butterfly lovers converged on the ‘Wall,’ all anxious to see the Tropical Hairstreak butterfly that had been spotted near the entrance to the Mission, Texas development. 

It happened again when the Gold-Bordered Hairstreak was spotted, nectaring nearby. The Gold Bordered drew a near mob, and earlier I shared how I was considered “selfish” when I came in low and close, for my Macro- lens cannot do its job at a distance of 10 feet.

This Aricia agestis agestis butterfly on the peak of Mt. Hermon in the HolyLand suffered an audience of me and my guide, and Erin had sum zero interest in rare butterflies.

Poor Aricia agestis, earning just the excitement of a single butterfly lover, on that overheated, high peak at the roof of Israel.

Jeff

Backwoods Beauty

Appalachian Brown Butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow in Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge, GA

Most of our favorite butterflies visit us, in our gardens, parks, roadside botany and fields. Those are the butterflies we know and enjoy. They accept our invite to come and nectar, on our coneflower, zinnias, fruit trees, buddleia and Mexican sunflower.

Show your neighbor/friend a photo you took of a less well known butterfly, and don’t they usually say, “I didn’t know we had these in _____________________ ( pick your state ).”

This is one of those “We have these in Georgia?” butterflies. The Appalachian Brown butterfly. They don’t know or care that you have a spectacular garden full of natives and nectar pumping plants.

This is none of the above, rather it is a Backwood beauty, found in swamps and wet meadows. This immediate one was seen in Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in middle Georgia.

I’m long on record that I love subtle browns, Love those ‘eyes’ and being kind of a march to your own drummer guy, appreciate such stand alone self-confidence.

Jeff

Who’s For You?

Appalachian Brown Butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow in Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge, GA

As the dialogue continues, with my new friend from the other side of this world (Sri Lanka) I find my mind aboil with interesting questions. This new acolyte to butterfly questing has thrown several questions at me, questions that only someone fresh to this field of interest might ask.

Reluctant to overwhelm new enthusiasts, I struggled to limit my ‘constructive criticism’ of her image shares to one or two possibles. Yesterday I urged that she work all of the butterflies that she has seen and choose just one, and shoot it out, and make herself a moderate expert on that one, and own that right to discuss it, after a body of serious field time observing it.

Well, since that share, all of these thoughts have been springing out in my mind. This image here, of an Appalachian Brown satyr, derives from several earlier discussions popped on wingedbeauty.com. Some of them go all the way back to those certain stores on Madison Avenue in NYNY in the 1980’s, when I had the grease to go into men’s clothing stores and come out with brown fedoras and brown (Oh, so chocolate brown) shoes.

Past the 2 decade mark, I now know that the majority of visitors here will give short shrift (i.e., spend little time viewing) a post we might make here of a brown butterfly, or of a skipper butterfly. Monarch? Heavy traffic. Gorgeous fresh Eastern Black Swallowtail? Heavy traffic. A Mourning Cloak in full regalia? Good traffic.

This sweet look snapped in Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in middle Georgia, USA, with its really likable ‘eyes?’ Well I shall only expect light to moderate traffic, for many very, very prized visitors and friends just don’t get whooed by browns.

So friends, if you’re really in it for them all, then go ahead and share the browns, for they are most certainly G-d’s creatures. Do though, anticipate that traffic will be . . .

Jeff