Blue Butterfly at Lynx Prairie

Eastern-Tailed Blue Butterfly II photographed by Jeff Zablow at Lynx Prairie Reserve, Ohio

The big boys at Lynx Prairie Reserve were there, flying in good numbers to Butterflyweed, Coneflower, and other wildflowers. Examining those great Spangle Fritillary butterflies, Edwards Hairstreaks, Monarch butterflies and those other butterflies I saw there.

I was on the lookout for other fresh butterflies. Adams County, Ohio was just what Angela said it could be, a rich land, nurturing rare wildflowers and orchids, as well as big flights of butterflies, moths and other insects.

What and how would I react to say a fine, fresh Eastern Tailed Blue butterfly? Shoot it of course. I did and here it is.

Jeff

Love the Blues, I Do

Common Blue Butterfly at Mt. Hermon, Israel

Common Blue Butterfly at Mt. Hermon, Israel photographed by Jeffrey Zablow ©2010, http://www.wingedbeauty.com

Tell me how many problems you have with the ‘common’ species name that they gave this butterfly, on the slopes of majestic Mt. Hermon, in Israel? The name? Common Blue Butterfly.

A blue that Frank Sinatra, Ole Blue Eyes, would’ve loved. The kind of blue that you drown in when you look into the eyes of anyone lucky enough to sport same. The class of blue on the finest china services of the very spoiled.

Here is my basis for continuing to shoot Fuji film. Love rich blues, browns, reds and more.

A ‘Common’ blue male, resting peacefully in the northernmost tip of Israel, in the Holyland, as surprised to see me as I was pleased to drink-in its privileged blue with my color thirst eyes.

Jeff

Singing the Blues in Just a Few Weeks?

Polymattus Icasus Z. butterfly, (dorsal view) photographed by Jeff Zablow in Neve Ativ,  Israel

Reminiscing of the memorable blues (Sinatra, Paul Newman, that girl from the Bronx . . . ), the morning of chasing tiny blue butterflies in the land surrounding Neve Ativ wasn’t delivering good blue butterfly images. I was in the northeastern tip of Israel, on the foothills leading to Mt. Hermon, in the fabled, and very green Golan. Syria was about 4 miles away, with its ISIL, Hezbollah, Russian, Iranian Republican Guard, Assad-loyal gangsters. No sign of war here, what with the hidden, but very formidable presence of Israel forces. There was also that small military plane, flying back and forth over nearby valleys, searching for possible border breeches.

I fly there again on March 28th, to spend my first Passover in the HolyLand, ever. My hosts? Well, my own daughter Rachel and her family, especially Hillel and Boaz. No hotels for me, family will not hear of it. I love sitting with the men, 100% of whom have served, most having seen battle, some like Moshe and Misha, in multiple wars. Some who have gone on missions never reported, never discussed, all to defend and protect. Americans mostly don’t know what that is like, and for that we are Blessed.

As can happen, after more than 2 hours afield, this macho! male flew in, and choose a yellow bloom, and began to nectar. Bluer than blue, me whispering, ‘Don’t leave, stay put.’ He did, and know that none of my shares are re-worked, all are as they were real-time. Frank, Paul, that girl from the Bronx . . . don’t know why, but these tiny blues evoke memories of eyes, extraordinary eyes. Polymattus icarus in a meadow just northeast of Neve Ativ.

Shall I look for you on my El Al flight?

Jeff

Captured! The Eastern Pygmy- Blue Butterfly

Little Metalmark butterfly at rest, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Shellman Bluff, GA

Coastal salt marshes and coastal salt pans! There I was with Nancy and John on the beautiful Georgia coast, in Shellman Bluff, then at Brunswick, and later to Jekyll Island. Shooting butterflies, gently aided by extraordinary butterfly spotters. Our conversations brought mentions of their field work in North America and Central America. Panama, who can imagine seeking the birds of Panama?

My primary objective on this 4-day trip? Eastern Pygmy-Blue butterflies. The smallest butterfly in the United States.

I am pleased to share this dorsal view of an Eastern Pygmy-Blue. My captures of ventral looks will be shared, but it’s this one that most pleases me. As with that other tiny recently shared, the Little Metalmark butterfly, photographing this Eastern Pygmy Blue required that I got down, down and further down. Their hostplants are diminutive, and the flowers that they visit are tiny themselves and on tiny plants.

I will never forget these little sweeties. Earnest to shoot them on Jekyll Island, I forgot. Forgot that the south harbors ticks, ticks that are vectors for Bad Diseases. I saw a beaut, and quickly got down to the ground, laying my body down. I shot away, Pop! pop! Pop! We all had a Super! day that day, and hours later, back in Shelllman Bluff, I prepared to shower, and There It Was!!! A tick adhered to my upper chest. John used forceps to carefully remove it . . . and Yes, a large red circle developed, quickly! Consensus was to watch that Ugly red blotch, and wait. I did. Returned to Eatonton. Almost a week later, no fever (Thank G-d!), no other signs of . . . Lyme Disease. But it was till a Red Circle, size of the c and forefinger make together.

Went to an Urgent Care facility in Eatonton, and the PA took blood, examined me, and shared that she thought I was lucky, and did not contract that dreaded disease. Time has gone by since then, and no sign of a problem.

Y’all think photographing lions and elephants and grizzlies is risky, then try shooting Eastern Pygmy-Blue butterflies. Urgent Care visits and ansy waiting for something bad.

I like this image, especially those orange-tipped antennae, and that comely yellow-brown color.

Fun, friends and angst, shooting the tiniest of them all.

Jeff