A Stand-Out Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly

Eastern Tailed Blue Pigeon photographed by Jeff Zablow at Mountain, GA

We found him in a meadow on Pigeon Mountain. We were in the northwestern corner or Georgia, the Georgia mountains, close to Cloudland Canyon State Park. He was basking in the warming early morning sun. Butterflies, especially male butterflies benefit from the morning sun’s comforting warmth, enabling them to begin flying at top speeds, rather than seeing them up to risk reduced speed, and probable predators.

This male Eastern Tailed-Blue butterfly is a handsome Lep, and one that stands out from those I’ve known these last decades. Those I’ve seen in New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio. Toronto, New Hampshire, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia and Delaware had orange Spots on the trailing edges of their dorsal (upper) hindwings. He lacks those orange spots.

Is he alone is not having dorsal hindwing orange spots? Do all of the Eastern Tailed-Blues of the Georgia Mountains and nearby Tennessee lack them? The Western Tailed-Blues have them, but they now are found some 1,700 miles west of Pigeon Mountain.

Hmmmm.

Jeff

Tinier Than A Two-Year-Old’s Fingernail

Eastern Pygmy Blue butterfly sipping nectar, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Shellman Bluff, GA

Imagine a butterfly that is tinier than a 2-year old child’s fingernail! Add to that it flits from tiny flower to tiny flower, frustrating the gentleman trying to capture a Macro- image of it. Where does it fly? Just a handful of inches (5″) from the ground.

I was determined to capture some OK images of such an Eastern Pygmy Blue Butterfly. We found them in 2 locations along the Georgia coast, Shellman Bluff and Jekyll Island.

Here then is an image of one of North Americas’s littlest butterflies, the Eastern Pygmy Blue Butterfly, seen in Shellman Bluff, along Georgia’s Atlantic coastline.

Tinier than a baby’s fingernail, it is.

Jeff

Rare Pygmy Blue View

Little Metalmark butterfly at rest, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Shellman Bluff, GA

Glassberg’s wonderful A Swift Guide to Butterflies of North America notes that “Eastern Pygmy-Blues rarely open their wings when landed.”

I’d remembered that. After quite a long time spent shooting them in Shellman Bluff, Georgia, this small miracle happened. I came upon a fresh Eastern Pygmy Blue butterfly that landed, for a brief moment. Then . . . it opened its wings and kept them open for moments!

I must have smiled from ear to ear, for this “rarely” is seen.

Here is a rare view of butterfly beauty. I took it. I much appreciated this opportunity, this day in Shellman Bluff.

Jeff

Why Did Mr. Guerin Choose So Holy A Name?

Azanous Jesous butterfly photographed by Jeffrey Zablow at Mt. Meron, Israel

This one of the Blue butterflies flies in the HolyLand. This one appeared on my Mt. Meron trail, in the very Upper Galilee. With so reverent a name as Azanus Jesous, I much wanted to score a good image of these tiny blues. Wingedbeauty’s visitors include many Christians, and I guessed that this butterfly, floating from blossom to HolyLand blossom, would mean alot to you.

Here is this mini-gem of a butterfly, resplendent with its numerous black hindwing dots and sweet reddish browns.

I wonder why Mr., Guerin named it so? Suggestions?

Jeff

Hands, Cellphones & Blues

Ceraunus Blue Butterfly photographed by Jeff Zablow at Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge, GA

Some of you do and others don’t. For those of you that do photograph butterflies often, and share your images, we wonder how you feel about photos of butterflies on your hands, your shoulders, your hat or hair, backpacks and in this instance, this Ceraunus Blue flew to our cellphone, perched and primmed there, and posed sweetly.

We’d been Keystone Copping the blues in that sandy spot at Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in coastal Georgia. We cautiously approach, it flees, we follow, it flees. When this Ceraunus flew up to the cellphone, this sweat covered cell, well, there was our opportunity to cop a good Ceraulnus Blue image. But . . .

Over these more than 2 decades, I’ve made certain decisions, concluded certain strategies and likes and dislikes.

Those include, I dislike images of butterflies on people’s hands, arms, shoulder, legs, head, ears, etc. That’s why I rarely ‘Like’ a FaceBook post of a newly eclosed Admiral on your hand. I just don’t think we should have such contact with wild animals, butterflies especially.

I admit that I didn’t throw this image into the circular file. Twenty five minutes of chasing them in that hot, sandy microhabitat, seemed to merit keeping and yes, publishing this image. I too admit that among my favorites images ever are the Jeff’s Earrings exposures taken by Sylbie at the Butterflies & Blooms Briar Patch Habitat in Eatonton, Georgia.

How do you react to images of butterflies, rare or common, perched on a hand or head? On a cell? Backpack?

Jeff