Find A Tamarck Pine – Find Bog Coppers

Tamarack Pine Tree, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Allenberg Bog in New York

We found Allenberg Bog. That western New York State bog was a treat. Tamarck Pine, bog Cranberry, Pitcher Plants and Sundew were there in abundance. They together verified that this was a true acid bog, a Sphagnum bog.

Allenberg also sported the Copper butterflies that I was searching for, Bog Coppers. The Cranberries were just finishing their flowering and the Bog Coppers were reaching the end of their flight. That means that the images I score, of Bog Coppers, did not 100% satisfy my determination to bring home good images of fresh Bog Coppers.

Barbara Ann is willing to once again join me, in search of that near impossible to find trail leading to Allenberg Bog. University owned (U. of Buffalo ?), I’m anxious to traipse the soft-spongy acid bog again, this time a bit earlier in June. The Tamarck Pines will greet me again, and the tiny Bog Coppers, will they dance for me as they did before?

Jeff

Back in Business in 2018

Tarucus Balkanizes butterfly  Near Syrian border, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Golan Heights, Israel

Remember this one? I unashamedly shared that I drove nearly 2 hours down from the Golan, along the Syrian border, to finally captures images of two butterflies that continued to elude me. I relied solely on a field guide map. I did find and shoot Tarucus rosaceus. That was good. I accomplished that goal.

Where, though was Tarucus balkanicus? Like T. rosaceus, T. balkanicus’s range straddled dangerous territory. It is found along the border with Syria and the Israeli border with Jordan, and it is found along Israel’s western border, along the Mediterranean, south of Tel Aviv, and not far from Gaza.

I finally, after much frustration, saw this tiny, tiny fine looking T. balkanicus! I so carefully got down on my stomach (ticks?) and even more carefully crawled closer to its perch on these diminutive flowers.

Jeff, this image is . . . poor. Why share? Just as I prepared to shoot away, rain came down!! Hard. This is what I got. It flew. Me? Drenched.

Drive hours, with no one to meet you and definitely show you where to see hard to find butterflies, and you run the risk of getting skunked, getting soaked, and wondering why do  . . . ?

Among my goals this Spring? Meet and shoot Hessel’s Hairstreaks and Elfins, several species of elfins. What do I have to assure me of success? Just field guide maps. Oh, and that determination that only you and I have, determined as we are to see the most beautiful and sometimes the least known of butterflies. And, to occasionally look around, and just Sigh! what with the beauty that surround us.

Dianas later? How does that go? “I’m so . . . . . . and you’re so. . . . . . , this Diana I’ve been told . . . . ” The rest, well I may remember it while out in the field.

Jeff

Zebra in the Bush

Zebra Heliconian butterfly on Tithonia I, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Butterflies and Blooms in the Briar Patch Habitat I, Eatonton, GA

Their flight is akin to ballet. Slow, with gentle floating movement, taking the Zebra Heliconioan up and down. Slow it may be, but the continuous change in altitude really challenges when you want coop an image.

We’ll soon see my images of an uncommon Erato Heliconian Butterly, seen in the the National Butterfly Center’s gardens in Mission, Texas. I was fortunate enough to watch that Erato fly away along a deep crevice in the Butterfly Center. It’s flight path was not like the Zebra’s. The Erato flew an almost projectile like line. That I will long remember, for those big, deep, bright red patches on each wing remained in clear view, throughout that more than 200′ path that it flew.

Back to the Zebra, met in the Butterflies and Blooms Briar Patch Habitat I, In Eatonton, Georgia. I sort of chased it from Tithonia bloom to Tithonia bloom. This time it stopped on one of those Mexican sunflower flowerheads, and I just decided, go for it, and share the reality of Zebras: You shoot what you can shoot, after you tire of trying to follow their at the Ballet progress. That’s what we have here. The reality of trying for a Zebra H. in the bush(es).

Jeff

Question Mark Butterfly at the Fruit Bar

Question Mark butterfly on Hanging basket, photographed by Jeff Zablow at Butterflies and Blooms in the Briar Patch Habitat I, Eatonton, GA

You stop there when you went to the old Butterflies and Blooms in the Briar Patch Habitat. I can’t count how many times I did in these last years, 2015 and 2016 and 2017.

Virginia hung this metal basket, often replacing the desiccated fruit in it with fresh, bananas, apples, orange, watermelon and more. That basket was busy from 8 A.M. to just before dusk.

Weeks ago, in the National Butterfly Center (NBC) in Mission, Texas I once again saw baskets, strategically set about the NBC’s acreage. There too I saw another tool that lures butterflies, common and rare. The NBC staff has set out ‘bait logs’ onto which they paint a glomp of a mix of fruit, beer and more. On those bait logs we saw Mexican Bluewing, Tropical Leafwing and many other uncommon butterflies.

This Question Mark butterfly looked very important when I saw it in the Habitat’s fruit basket. Fresh, I was pleased to view this image when it was processed. The “question mark ‘?'” itself pops! Those blue marks along the trailing edge of the hindwing show nicely, the wing margins look handsome and those ants on the melon remind of all ants everywhere, focused and purposeful.

Fruit baskets and bait logs, I’ve got them on my own future to-do list, being desirious of hosting butterflies and other wildlife.

Jeff