Azanus Ubaldus Butterfly

Azanus Jesous Butterfly photographed by Jeffrey Zablow in Binyamina, Israel

In the last year I’ve walked down streets in Pittsburgh, PA; Savannah, GA; Irvine, CA; Brooklyn, NY; Jerusalem, Israel and New York, NY. People watching is quite interesting. I always see an infinite number of faces, shapes, dress, types of walk, etc. You never know who you will see next. Will they exchange glances? Will they greet you with a “Hello!”  Will they reciprocate your joy of living, joy of experiencing live in its fullest, and for the near future, joy of your freedom from chaos, mayhem and evil?

So it is when you move through a habitat to find and photograph butterflies. You already know most of them, and they don’t vary much from one to the next, until? Well this female caught my eye while I was photographing the site of an 800 year old, excavated synagogue in Ein Gedi, Israel. It was a tiny butterfly; her proboscis was actively collecting nectar from this bush, and she tolerated my careful approach. Azanus Ubaldus populations are found from the Dead Sea south to the tip of the Sinai Peninsula and then along the western coast of the Sinai (D. Benyamini, A Field Guide to the Butterflies of Israel). Moments later, She’s gone!

The feeling of satisfaction that follows an encounter with a butterfly I’ve not ever met before is . . . Well you know the feeling. We all experience it, however it is triggered in each of us.

Jeff

9 thoughts on “Azanus Ubaldus Butterfly

    • Thanks Paula. My inclination is that they are not closely related. Your drawing of Blues on woodblock is so sweet, light and upbeat. Where is this whimsical place?
      Jeff

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      • I bought the woodblock at a floral shop and the blues were fluttering in our garden in Belgium. The first butterfly I saw this year (in a city) was an icarus. I choice the solid woodblock to contrast the fragility of the butterflies.
        You did the same in your photo. :-)

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    • Cary, My determination that it’s a female is based on the dark, striking markings on her wings, as well as the prominence of the 6 black spots on each hindwing. An uncommon species, the only field guides available to me have Hebrew texts. Something of a challenge. (See A Field Guide to the Butterflies of Israel by Dubi Benyamini).

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      • Was wondering, Jeffrey, because I get a lot of a yellow Monarchs (perhaps a different species?) that are attracted to a couple of trees, and have a shot of a pair mating (in one of my Facebook albums – “Fotos” – can send the link if you’d like) but see no wing or markings difference.

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  1. Thank you for share it, I think when somebody discover the beauty around is able to discover it inside.

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